William Feake

M, b. circa 1537, d. before 18 May 1595
FatherJames Feake d. b 18 Jul 1539
MotherAgnes (?)
     William was born circa 1537 in Wighton, County Norfolk, England. William married Mary Wetherhyll, daughter of John Wetherhyll, on 12 November 1564 in London, County Middlesex, England, at St. Mary Woolnoth Church.1,2 He was a goldsmith. The family lived on Lombard Street in London. William made his will on 7 May 1595 at London, County Middlesex, England.


In the name of God, Amen - The seventh day of May Anno Domini a thousand five hundred ninety five and the seven and thirtyth year of the reign of our Sovereign Lady, Elizabeth, by the grace of God, Queen of England, France and Ireland, defender of the faith. For I, William Feake, the elder, citizen and goldsmith of London, being at this present weak and sick in body howbeit of good sound and perfect mind and memory [God be thanked for it], do declare, ordain and make this my present testament, containing therein my only last will and concerning the order and disposition aswell of all and singular my messuage, landed tenements and hereditaments with their appurtenances as also of all and singular my goods and chattels, money and movables whatsoever in manner and form following. That is to say, first and principally, I commend and commit my soul into the hands of Almighty God, the Father, my Creator to His son, Jesus Christ, my only Redeemer and Savior and to the Holy Ghost, sanctifier three distinct persons and one eternal and ever living God. Assuredly trusting and faithfully believing to be saved and to have full pardon and forgiveness of all my sins by the only death and passion of my Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, my body to the earth from whence it came to be decently buried and in Christian manner brought to the ground and buried in the parish church of St. Edmund the King in Lombard Street in London where I am a parishioner at my pew door in the same church committing and wholly referring the charges of my funeral to the good discretion of my executrix herein after named. Nevertheless, I give to twenty poor men of the poorest of my company of goldsmiths twenty gowns of twenty shillings ___ a piece and twelve pence a piece for their dinner. And to ten other poor men at the discretion of my executrix ten gowns of the like price and twelve pence a piece in money. Also, I give to every of my brethren's children now in London and to every of my men and women servants a cloak or a gown. And I will that by my executrix under named all my _____ and true debts shall be well and truly paid within convenient time after my decease. And, I give to fifteen of my friends to be named and appointed at and by the discretion of mine executrix fifteen black gowns. And after my debts paid and funeral's discharged, I will that all and singular my goods, chattels, leases, ready money, debts and movables whatsoever shall according to the ancient and laudable use and custom of the City of London be divided into three equal shares, parts and portions. One equal third part or share whereof I give and bequeath unto Mary, my beloved wife, to her own proper use forever more. The second equal part or share thereof I give and bequeath unto and amongst Thomas, John, Edward, Sarah and Rebecca, my children, to be paid and delivered to the same Thomas, John and Edward at their several ages of one and twenty years and to the said Sarah and Rebecca, my daughters, at their several ages of one and twenty years or at their marriage first coming or happening. And if any of them the said Thomas, John, Edward, Sarah or Rebecca shall die and depart this life before the said several times before limited and appointed for the payment of their portion, then I will that the share part and portion of him or her so deceasing shall remain and be paid unto the ___ and survivors of them at the time before appointed. And the third equal share part and portion of all my said goods, chattels, ready money, debts and movables. I reserve unto myself to be disposed and ordered as followeth. That is to say, I give and bequeath to be given and distributed unto and amongst the poor of the said parish of St. Edmund at and by the discretions of the church wardens of the same parish for the time being three pounds in money and I give unto the same church wardons of that parish, the other three pounds in money to be used and disposed for other necessary use of the same parish

as the parishioners there being assembled at a vestry shall appoint and think good. Item, I give and bequeath to the relief and service of the poor prisoners in every of the seven prisons of the Queen's bench, the Marshalsea and the white Lion in Southwarke, Newgate, Ludgate and the two Compters in London,
one and twenty pounds, that is to each prison three pounds. Also I give and bequeath to Christ's Hospital in London twenty marks and to St. Thomas and St. Bartholomew's Hospital six pounds, thirteen shillings, four pence a piece. Item, I give toward the maintenance and relief of poor and towardly ye scholars in the University of Cambridge ten pounds. Item, I give and bequeath to the livery of my company of goldsmiths in London for a dinner or a repast to be had and made amongst them at my burial twelve pounds in money. And I give to the same company for a remembrance of me, a poor member, thereof a cup of silver and gilt of the value of twenty pounds. Item, whereas I have bestowed five and thirty pounds or thereabouts upon the building of an house wherein six poor men or women are placed to dwell within the town and parish of Wighton in the county of Norfolk where I was born. I will that mine' executrix hereafter named shall within one year next after my decease deliver and pay unto the parson, church warden and parishioners of the said parish of Wighton for the time being so much money as will purchase houses, lands and tenements of the clear yearly value of twenty six shilling eight pence above all charges or else shall herself within that time purchase lands or tenements of that clear yearly value and give the same to the parson and church wardens and their successors forever to the intent that they and their successors with and out of the rents and profits thereof shall pay unto the said six poor men or women that shall for the time being dwell in the said house six pence weakly forever. Item, I will that my said executrix shall within one year next after my decease deliver and pay unto the wardens of the art or mystery of Goldsmith within the city of London and to the coialtie of the same art and mystery or to their successors so much ready money as will purchase houses, lands or tenements of the clear yearly value of three pounds, ten shillings above all charges and reprises: or else shall herself, within that time, purchase lands or tenements of that clear yearly value and give the same to the same wardens and a coialite and to their successors forever to the intent that they and their successors with and out of the rents and profits thereof shall weekly pay to two poor goldsmiths' widows eight pence a piece weekly forever. Item, I further will that my said executrix shall within the said space of one year next after my decease pay and deliver unto Governors of the house of Bridewell in London so much ready money as will purchase to them and their successors' houses, lands or tenements of the clear yearly value of three pounds above all charges and reprises or else shall herself purchase lands or tenements of that clear yearly value and give the same to the same governors and their successors forever to the intent that they and their successors shall for every employee and bestow the yearly rents and profits of the same lands or tenements for and to the relief of the poor and needy people for the time being in that house. Item, I give and bequeath unto James, Parnell, Mary, Margaret, Judith and Anne, the children of my brother, James Feake deceased ten pounds apiece. Item whereas I have heretofore given to some of the children of my brother, Edmund Feake, ten pounds apiece. I do now give and bequeath unto every of his other children to whom I have not already given the like sum, saving Anne Feake, now dwelling with me, the sum of ten pounds apiece. And to the same Anne Feake I give sixteen pounds in money besides the four pounds I have in my hands and received to her use of the gift and bequest of her mother's brother. Also whereas I have heretofore given to some of my sister, Jygg's children forty shillings apiece, I do now give and bequeath unto every of her other children to whom I have not already paid and given the like sum, the sum of forty shillings apiece. And whereas I have heretofore given to some of the children of my brother, John Angell, forty shillings apiece. I do now give and bequeath unto every of the other children of my said brother, John Angell, to whom I have not already given and paid the like sum, the sum of forty shillings apiece. And where also I have heretofore given and paid unto some of the children of my brother, William Angell, forty shillings apiece. I do now give and bequeath unto every of the other children of my said brother, William Angell, to whom I have not already given and paid the like sum, the sum of forty shillings apiece. And whereas also I have heretofore given and paid unto some of the children of my brother, Simon Feake, three pounds six shillings eight pence apiece. I do now give and bequeath to every of the children of my said brother, Simon Feake, to whom I have not already given and paid the like sum, the sum of three pounds six shillings eight pence apiece. Item, I will that my said executrix shall within one year next after my decease give deliver and pay unto my son, James Feake, the sum of three hundred pounds in money he the said James at or before the receipt thereof entering into bond to my said executrix to pay unto my said son, William, and Mary, his wife, during their natural lives and the life of the longer liver of them the sum of ten shillings weekly. And after the death of both of them the same William., my son, and Mary, his wife, that the same James, my son, his executors and administrators shall retain and keep the said three hundred pounds to their own proper use forever. Also, I give and bequeath to my son-in-law, Thomas Barneham, and Mary, his wife, the sum of four hundred pounds in money. Item, where as I have and hold for divers years yet to come, by virtue of two several leases, the one made from and by the wardens and coialtie of the art or mystery of Goldsmiths in London and the other by and from Mr. Younge, grocer, all my now dwelling house with the appurtenances in Lombard Street and three tenements in Birchen Lane in London whereof the one is called the sign of the Ball. Another is in the occupancy of William Banester. And the third is in the occupation of Michael Alexander. I do now will and devise that the said Mary, my wife, shall hold and enjoy my said now dwelling house with the appurtenances in Birchen Lane for and during so many of the years therein yet to come as she shall live. She answering, paying and performing from time to time the rents, convenients and agreements comprised in the lease thereof made on the leases part and behalf to be paid and performed provided always that my said wife shall not make any alienation lease, grant or demise of the said dwelling house or of the said three other tenements in Birchen Lane or of any parcel of them without the consent and agreement of my son, James, first had and obtained in writing under his hand the residue and remainder of the years that at the time of the decease of the said Mary, my wife shall be to come in the said dwelling house and the three other tenements in Birchen Lane by virtue the said two leases. I give and devise unto the said James Feake, my son, to have and to hold to him his executors and assigns to his and their own proper use. Also, I will that the said Mary, my wife, shall at her own charges keep and maintain my said son, Thomas, at his learning and study in the University until he shall attain the age of thirty years. Also, I will that my said wife shall put out and place my said son, John, apprenticed to some honest merchant, fearing God and of good trade and credit and for his better preferment shall deliver out with him one hundred pounds in money to him that shall take him to his apprentice to be by him had in use and occupying during his apprenticehood giving sufficient bond with security for the repayment thereof at the end of his term of apprenticehood or in some reasonable time after the death of the same John as shall be agreed upon in case he, the same John shall happen to decease within his term of apprentice hood. Item, I will in my mind and meaning is that the sum of two hundred pounds which my son-in-law, Thomas Barneham, standeth bound to me by obligation to pay my said son, Edward, at his age of one and twenty years and likewise the sum of two hundred pounds which my said son, James Feake, standeth bound to me by obligation to pay to my said son, John, at his age of one and twenty years shall be accompted and accepted by them the same Edward and John, my sons, as parts and parcels of their said portions of all my said goods, chattels and debts. The rest and residue of all my said third part and portion of my said goods, chattels and ready money and debts not before given or disposed after my debts and funeral paid and discharged, I give and bequeath to the said Mary, my wife, to her own proper use by her to be used and disposed as I have between her and me appointed and given order according to the trust and confidence I repose in her in that behalf which Mary, my wife, I make, ordain and constitute my full and sole executrix of this my last will and testament. And as concerning the order and this disposition of all and singular my messuage, lands, tenements and hereditaments with appurtenances set and being in Lonmbard Street in St. Swithines Lane in London. I make and declare my last will and testament thereof in manner and form following, that is to say I give and devise unto the said Mary, my wife, all that my messuage or tenement with appurtenances now called or known by the name of the sign of Noah, now in the occupation of Noah Farmer, goldsmith and all those my two tenements with appurtenances now made and divided into three tenements set and being in St. Swithines Lane which I bought and purchased of Mr. Nicholas Herrick, to have and to hold all the same messuages or tenements with the appurtenances unto the said Mary, my wife, for and during the term of her natural life. The remainder thereof after her decease unto the said Thomas, my son, and to the heirs of his body lawfully to be begotten. The remainder thereof for want of such issue to my said son, William, and to the heirs of his body lawfully begotten and to be begotten. And for want of such issue all the same premises to remain to my said son, James, and to the heirs of his body lawfully begotten. And for want of such issue to remain to my said son, John, and to the heirs of his body lawfully begotten and to be begotten, the remainder thereof for want of further issue to my said son, Edward, and to the heirs of his body lawfully to be begotten. And for want of such issue all the said premises with appurtenances, wholly to remain unto Mary, Sarah, and Rebecca, my daughters and to their heirs forever, provided always and my will and meaning is that my said son, Thomas, shall take and accept the gift of the said messuage or tenement with appurtenances at and for the rate of four hundred pounds and part or payment of his part portion of my said goods and chattels to him due and appertaining by the custom of the said city.
In witness whereof I, the said William Feake to this my present my last will and testament containing in all twelve sheets of paper have put my hand and seal the day and year above written these being witnesses James Pemberton and Robert Preston.3

He was buried in London, County Middlesex, England, in St. Edmund the King Church. William departed this life before 18 May 1595 in London, County Middlesex, England. His will was probated on 18 May 1595.

Additional Notes:

His son, William, mentioned a sister, Jygg, and brothers: William & John Augell/Angel,in his will in 1595. It is possible that Agnes remarried again to a Mr. Awgell/Angel and William, John & Jygg were children of that marriage. Jygg was likely a surname of her daughter. Or possibly, William and John were brother-in-laws.

Family

Mary Wetherhyll d. 21 Aug 1619
Children

Citations

  1. [S1079] George E. McCracken, The Feake Family of Norfolk, London, and Colonial America, pages 138-139 - . . . William Feake married at the church St. Mary Woolnoth, London on Novembr 12, 1564, Mary Wetherall of London. The 1623 pedigree gives her father's occupation as aurifaber but does not give his first name. Research into her ancestry is not complete but it is probable that she was a daughter of Thomas Wetherall, citizen & goldsmith of London.. . . . as Colonel Banks apppears to have thought possible, the daughter of John Wetherhill of London, goldsmith.
    The Wetherall arms on the silver gilt cup are: Argent two lions passant guardant sable, on a chief of the second three cups or, and are stated in Burke's Enclclopedia of Heraldry to have been borne by a Lincolnshire family of the same name. . . . No success haas brrn had in locating the family.
    [Note: 1urifaber - Latinized form of the Germansurname Goldschmidt. - klm]
  2. [S1084] London, England, Baptisms, Marriages & Burials 1538-1812: St. Mary Woolnoth Church Marriage Recordsm- 1564: the XIIth day of the same month of November now married with William Ffeeke to Marye Wetherhyll [Transcribed from photo copy of original church record 14 March 2011 by Larry & Kathy McCurdy] - transcribed by Ancestry.com.
  3. [S989] National Archives of the United Kingdom: Will of William Feake dated: 07 May 1595 [Transcribed by Larry & Kathy McCurdy 26 February 2011; corrected & edited by Sidney Holdredge.].