Percival Seaman

M, b. 11 October 1804, d. 4 April 1883
Percival Seaman|b. 11 Oct 1804\nd. 4 Apr 1883|p3.htm#i30938|Dr. Valentine Seaman|b. 2 Mar 1770\nd. 3 Jul 1817|p2.htm#i30920|Anna Ferris|b. 8 Dec 1771\nd. 5 Nov 1854|p2.htm#i30921|||||||John Ferris|b. 9 Jun 1733\nd. 3 Jan 1814|p3.htm#i31126|Marianna "Myanna" Hunt|b. c 1738\nd. 9 Jul 1809|p3.htm#i31127|
FatherDr. Valentine Seaman b. 2 Mar 1770, d. 3 Jul 1817
MotherAnna Ferris b. 8 Dec 1771, d. 5 Nov 1854
     Percival was born on Thursday, 11 October 1804 at the family home at 90 Beekman Street, City, County & State of New York. (an unknown value). Percival died suddenly on Wednesday, 4 April 1883, at Westchester, Westchester County, New York, at age 78 years, 5 months and 24 days. On Saturday, his body was taken to the Harlem iver Station on the New Haven Branch Railroad where at 11:55 am he traveled for 35 minuteride. Carriages met the train and a funeral procession took him to the Friend's Meeting House, where his funeral took place at 12:30.1 Percival was buried.

Citations

  1. [S36] Death Notice: Percival Seaman, Seaman - Suddenly, at West Chester, N.Y., April 4, 1883. Percival Seaman, son of the late Dr. Valentine Seaman in the 79th year of his age.
    Funeral from Friends Meeting house, West Chester on Saturday, 7th inst. At 12:30 o'clock. Carriages will meet train leaving Harlem River station, New Haven Branch Railroad, at 11:55 a.m.

Willett J. Seaman

M, b. 9 June 1808, d. circa 18 March 1878
Willett J. Seaman|b. 9 Jun 1808\nd. c 18 Mar 1878|p3.htm#i30939|Dr. Valentine Seaman|b. 2 Mar 1770\nd. 3 Jul 1817|p2.htm#i30920|Anna Ferris|b. 8 Dec 1771\nd. 5 Nov 1854|p2.htm#i30921|||||||John Ferris|b. 9 Jun 1733\nd. 3 Jan 1814|p3.htm#i31126|Marianna "Myanna" Hunt|b. c 1738\nd. 9 Jul 1809|p3.htm#i31127|
FatherDr. Valentine Seaman b. 2 Mar 1770, d. 3 Jul 1817
MotherAnna Ferris b. 8 Dec 1771, d. 5 Nov 1854
     Willett was born on Thursday, 9 June 1808 at the family home at 90 Beekman Street, City, County & State of New York. Willett married Susan W. Hendricks circa 1832 at New York. 4 September 1850, Willett and his wife, Susan, were listed on the U.S. Federal Census. Enumerated in this household were Willit Seaman [44 New York], Susan [40 New York], William W. [17 New York], Eliza [15 New York],, Sarah [7 New York]. Willit is running livery stable.1 16 August 1860, Willett and his wife, Susan, were listed on the U.S. Federal Census at City, County & State of New York. Enumerated in this household were Willet Seaman [50 New York], his wife: Susan [40 New Jersey], children: William [24 New Jersey - clerk], Eliza [20 New York], Sarah [16 New York], Sarah Henderson [68 New Jersey] and some borders.2 15 June 1870, Willett and his wife, Susan, were listed on the U.S. Federal Census at City, County & State of New York. Enumerated in this household were Willet Seaman [50 New York], his wife: Susan [40 New Jersey], children: William [24 New Jersey - clerk], Eliza [20 New York], Sarah [16 New York], Sarah Henderson [68 New Jersey] and some borders.3 Willett died circa 18 March 1878 at his home at 139 West 14th Street, City, County & State of New York.

Family

Susan W. Hendricks b. Oct 1809, d. 18 Oct 1905
Children

Citations

  1. [S25] 1850 United States Federal Census, Western 1/2 of 15th Ward, New York City, New York - sheet 159, line 19.
  2. [S24] 1860 United States Federal Census, Western 1/2 of 15th Ward, New York City, New York - sheet 159, line 19.
  3. [S22] 1870 United States Federal Census, 1st Election Disrict of the 16th Ward, New York City, New York - sheet 10, line 13.

Susan W. Hendricks

F, b. October 1809, d. 18 October 1905
     Susan was born in October 1809 at New Jersey. Susan married Willett J. Seaman, son of Dr. Valentine Seaman and Anna Ferris, circa 1832 at New York. Her married name was Seaman. 4 September 1850, Susan and her husband Willett were listed on the U.S. Federal Census . Enumerated in this household were Willit Seaman [44 New York], Susan [40 New York], William W. [17 New York], Eliza [15 New York],, Sarah [7 New York]. Willit is running livery stable.1 16 August 1860, Susan and her husband Willett were listed on the U.S. Federal Census at City, County & State of New York. Enumerated in this household were Willet Seaman [50 New York], his wife: Susan [40 New Jersey], children: William [24 New Jersey - clerk], Eliza [20 New York], Sarah [16 New York], Sarah Henderson [68 New Jersey] and some borders.2 15 June 1870, Susan and her husband Willett were listed on the U.S. Federal Census at City, County & State of New York. Enumerated in this household were Willet Seaman [50 New York], his wife: Susan [40 New Jersey], children: William [24 New Jersey - clerk], Eliza [20 New York], Sarah [16 New York], Sarah Henderson [68 New Jersey] and some borders.3 14 June 1880, Susan was listed on the U.S. Federal Census at 139 West 14th Street, City, County & State of New York. Enumerated in this household were Susan W. Seaman [70 New Jersey-widow], daughters: Eliza McFarlan [45 New York-widow] & Sarah [30 New York], grandson: Francis McFarlan [16 New York], several borders & servants. Susan is running abording house.4 7 June 1900, Susan was listed on the U.S. Federal Census at 114 West 2nd Street, City, County & State of New York. Enumerated in this household were Susan W. Seaman [90 New Jersey - October 1809][widow], ... Eliza A. McFarlan [65 New York - February 1835]. Susan & Eliza are running a bording house.5 Susan died Wednesday, 18 October 1905 at her home at West 2nd Street, City, County & State of New York, at age 96 years.6

Family

Willett J. Seaman b. 9 Jun 1808, d. c 18 Mar 1878
Marriage*Susan married Willett J. Seaman, son of Dr. Valentine Seaman and Anna Ferris, circa 1832 at New York. 
Children

Citations

  1. [S25] 1850 United States Federal Census, Western 1/2 of 15th Ward, New York City, New York - sheet 159, line 19.
  2. [S24] 1860 United States Federal Census, Western 1/2 of 15th Ward, New York City, New York - sheet 159, line 19.
  3. [S22] 1870 United States Federal Census, 1st Election Disrict of the 16th Ward, New York City, New York - sheet 10, line 13.
  4. [S21] 1880 United States Federal Census, Manhattan in the City, County& State of New York - Enumeration District 183, sheet 4, line 17.
  5. [S23] 1900 United States Federal Census, City, County & State of New York - Enumeration District 477, sheet4b, line 57.
  6. [S56] New York Death Index, Susan W. Seaman died 18 October 1905 age 96 years.

Marianna Seaman

F, b. 20 April 1810, d. 16 October 1831
Marianna Seaman|b. 20 Apr 1810\nd. 16 Oct 1831|p3.htm#i30941|Dr. Valentine Seaman|b. 2 Mar 1770\nd. 3 Jul 1817|p2.htm#i30920|Anna Ferris|b. 8 Dec 1771\nd. 5 Nov 1854|p2.htm#i30921|||||||John Ferris|b. 9 Jun 1733\nd. 3 Jan 1814|p3.htm#i31126|Marianna "Myanna" Hunt|b. c 1738\nd. 9 Jul 1809|p3.htm#i31127|
FatherDr. Valentine Seaman b. 2 Mar 1770, d. 3 Jul 1817
MotherAnna Ferris b. 8 Dec 1771, d. 5 Nov 1854
     Marianna was born on Friday, 20 April 1810 at the family home at 90 Beekman Street, City, County & State of New York. Marianna married George W. Middlebrook circa 1829 at New York City, New York County, New York. Marianna died Sunday, 16 October 1831 at New York at age 21 years, 5 months and 26 days. Marianna was buried at the Friend's Burying Ground on North Street, City, County & State of New York.1

Family

George W. Middlebrook

Citations

  1. [S20] Eliza Seaman Leggett, Journal of Eliza Seaman Leggett, Eliza speaks of her dearly loved sister, Marianna's burial.

George W. Middlebrook

M
     George was born. George married Marianna Seaman, daughter of Dr. Valentine Seaman and Anna Ferris, circa 1829 at New York City, New York County, New York. George died .

Family

Marianna Seaman b. 20 Apr 1810, d. 16 Oct 1831

Anna Seaman

F, b. 18 March 1812, d. 1897
Anna Seaman|b. 18 Mar 1812\nd. 1897|p3.htm#i30943|Dr. Valentine Seaman|b. 2 Mar 1770\nd. 3 Jul 1817|p2.htm#i30920|Anna Ferris|b. 8 Dec 1771\nd. 5 Nov 1854|p2.htm#i30921|||||||John Ferris|b. 9 Jun 1733\nd. 3 Jan 1814|p3.htm#i31126|Marianna "Myanna" Hunt|b. c 1738\nd. 9 Jul 1809|p3.htm#i31127|
FatherDr. Valentine Seaman b. 2 Mar 1770, d. 3 Jul 1817
MotherAnna Ferris b. 8 Dec 1771, d. 5 Nov 1854
     Anna was born on Wednesday, 18 March 1812 at the family home at 90 Beekman Street, City, County & State of New York. Anna married Charlton Ferris, son of Elijah Ferris and Amelia Livingston, on 9 December 1842 at New York. 18 November 1850, Anna and her husband Charlton were listed on the U.S. Federal Census at West Farms, Westchester County, New York. Enumerated in this household were Charlton Ferris [41 New York], Anna A. [38 New York], Anna A. [6 New York], Charlton [3 New York], Amelia [77 New York], William L. [45 New York], Delikiah Cally [76 New York], Ellen Herrigan [18 Ireland], Elija Lanton [31 New York][black], & Catherine Hicky [17 Ireland]. William L. Ferris is a horticulturalist.1 15 July 1870, Anna and her husband Charlton were listed on the U.S. Federal Census at Westchester, Westchester County, New York. Enumerated in this household were Charlton Ferris [60 New York], his wife: Anna [58 New York], children: Anna [25 New York], domestic servant: Margaret Burns [45 Ireland], Mary Burns [50 Ireland], laborer: Michael Burns [17 Georgia], William Ferris [61 New York]. William Ferris is keeping a nursey.2 Anna died 1897 at age 84 years.

Family

Charlton Ferris b. 22 Aug 1808, d. 5 Jul 1871
Children

Citations

  1. [S25] 1850 United States Federal Census, Westchester, Westchester County, New York - sheet 339, line 33.
  2. [S22] 1870 United States Federal Census, Westchester, Westchester County, New York - sheet 306b, line 40 & 307a, line 1.

Charlton Ferris

M, b. 22 August 1808, d. 5 July 1871
Charlton Ferris|b. 22 Aug 1808\nd. 5 Jul 1871|p3.htm#i30944|Elijah Ferris|b. 24 Jan 1768\nd. 7 May 1842|p3.htm#i31136|Amelia Livingston|b. 5 Oct 1772\nd. 1 Mar 1853|p3.htm#i31138|John Ferris|b. 9 Jun 1733\nd. 3 Jan 1814|p3.htm#i31126|Marianna "Myanna" Hunt|b. c 1738\nd. 9 Jul 1809|p3.htm#i31127|||||||
FatherElijah Ferris b. 24 Jan 1768, d. 7 May 1842
MotherAmelia Livingston b. 5 Oct 1772, d. 1 Mar 1853
     Charlton was born on Monday, 22 August 1808 at Westchester County, New York. Charlton married Anna Seaman, daughter of Dr. Valentine Seaman and Anna Ferris, on 9 December 1842 at New York. 18 November 1850, Charlton and his wife, Anna, were listed on the U.S. Federal Census at West Farms, Westchester County, New York. Enumerated in this household were Charlton Ferris [41 New York], Anna A. [38 New York], Anna A. [6 New York], Charlton [3 New York], Amelia [77 New York], William L. [45 New York], Delikiah Cally [76 New York], Ellen Herrigan [18 Ireland], Elija Lanton [31 New York][black], & Catherine Hicky [17 Ireland]. William L. Ferris is a horticulturalist.1 15 July 1870, Charlton and his wife, Anna, were listed on the U.S. Federal Census at Westchester, Westchester County, New York. Enumerated in this household were Charlton Ferris [60 New York], his wife: Anna [58 New York], children: Anna [25 New York], domestic servant: Margaret Burns [45 Ireland], Mary Burns [50 Ireland], laborer: Michael Burns [17 Georgia], William Ferris [61 New York]. William Ferris is keeping a nursey.2 Charlton died Wednesday, 5 July 1871 at Westchester, Westchester County, New York, at age 62 years, 10 months and 13 days.

Family

Anna Seaman b. 18 Mar 1812, d. 1897
Children

Citations

  1. [S25] 1850 United States Federal Census, Westchester, Westchester County, New York - sheet 339, line 33.
  2. [S22] 1870 United States Federal Census, Westchester, Westchester County, New York - sheet 306b, line 40 & 307a, line 1.

John Ferris1,2

M, b. 9 June 1733, d. 3 January 1814
     John was born on Tuesday, 9 June 1733 at Throgs Neck, Westchester County, New York. John married Marianna "Myanna" Hunt on 15 December 1756 at Westchester County, New York. (an unknown value). John died Monday, 3 January 1814 at the family home "Grove Farm", Throgs Neck, Westchester County, New York, at age 80 years, 6 months and 25 days. When he did not show for breakfast, his grandson, Lindley was sent to get him. He found him seated on the side of the bed partly dressed. He turned to Lyndley and said, "I'm dying, and before the family could be called, he was gone..." He was buried in the Ferris Burying Ground.3,4

Family

Marianna "Myanna" Hunt b. c 1738, d. 9 Jul 1809
Children

Citations

  1. [S3] James G. Ferris, Bones & Bombs, Many of the dates are located here.
  2. [S10] Elizabeth Seaman Leggett, Journals of Elizabeth Seaman Leggett, "My mother used to say that her name was Anna and that grandfather in his foundness called her "MY Anna" and so the name came to be. I am quite inclined to think it was the case, as my Mother was named Anna - and she said it was for her mother - well this My Anna - as I will call her - was a wonderful little person - in all ways that appertaided to home rule - and excellent housekeeping. Many aneodotes are related of her bravery during the revolutionary war, the old house bears the marks of the British bullets. In this great generous mansion there are four kitchens upon the first floor in range with sitting or common room. To save time, you may know that everything in this home was on a most generous scale, large rooms, hall kitchens, from the sitting room that had its outlook over a great stretch of farm land you saw the Long Island Sound. The first kitchen was next to this room - it also was very large. As we enter it from the back door of the sitting room a swing door, or a door very common in the old house out in two parts, the door could be closed to prevent children crawling out - and the upper to let in light and air - there was a pavement of stones from a distance outside the kitchens, these brot from the fields and adjusted as best they could be, putting the flat side uppermost. The pump stood directly in front of the door perhaps 20 feet off, with a huge trough to which the horses were brot to drink and in which ducks, geese, and children delighted to dip into. Beside the door and its huge iron handle - which served also for a knocker - was a deep bay window, a seat in it, where, children also delighted to climb into. A small passage continuing on nearby the front wall led into the great (?) kitchen of all where, when I was young, old Delilah, Dilly for short, reigned. What I am trying to write about was during the Revolutionary War - opposite to the door that we came in from the sitting room was the fireplace - to describe this I would have in every part of it deal in the superlative not only as my childhood eyes saw it, but in measurement of older years. It is yet - tall mantle fully six feet from the stone hearth that came halfway to the sitting room door - these large hearths were to protect from the fire - if one of the logs broke apart scattering coals and chunks - on the mantle were the tinder box, pipes and the gun with many useful traps but the glory was the open fire place. Nevermind how wide or deep it was Mrs. Beecher in her will describes it to you. A stuff green curtain was tacked on the mantle and hung down perhaps _ of a yard, this to carry the smoke. Children could site inside this spacious place - one each side of the blazing fire and crack nuts or eat apples and listen to stories, but one place in the side of the fireplace was funny - it looked like a little oven but had no door to it - it was built perhaps three feet into the wall. In this a baby could be cuddled after it was put to sleep and lay as snug as a bug in a rug for any indefinite period. Cupboards, two, that nearly reached to the ceiling - quite fanciful these with scolloped shelves and painted red inside - were filled with queer old China much mended some of it - ancient all probably came into our country when the first great he and she of our family "Came over". Much of it wedge-wood ever so pretty. As to their value - would bring if not almost their weight in gold for they were very heavy - yet fabulous prices - following along the wall we come to the door leading into the hall - then a turn and we get to the door leading to that mysterious region the cellar, oh these cellars of our grandfather - full of salt water - delicacies in winter oysters, clams, soft clams also - all cured with sea weed, great heaps of these that were fed every day or two with Indian meal - and a sprinkling of salt water - and they grew fat, Yum, Yum - if you read the times of the old war, you will know something of the Hoboys and Skinners scamps who stole from friend and foe alike, landless, reckless - who prowled about the farm homes seeking what they might not only devour but to carry off the cattle and sheep, chickens anything. So many homes were left unprotected with women and a few servants, perhaps slaves in those days. The home was a mile from the main road or from any neighbor. The farm itself was quite a territory. You know in those days farms were not bought by the acre but by the mile so Grove Farm extended for many miles. When I was a child and heard my uncles tell, I thought, it embraced all of the West Chester, well it was a grand place for those fellows to attach - Grandfather was often way with his sloop, perhaps taking a load of oysters or farm truck to the city, New York, for all farm produce brot large prices - this middle kitchen was where the mothers and daughters did the nicer cooking - preserving, cake making - often churning - and find ironing and clear starching - a very useful place - Now our grandmother was making dough-nuts, most savory odor. Now too there came tramping a set of these outlaws and came into this middle kitchen; our little grandmother knew no fear - but she knew well enough what this sudden incoming meant, in a flash, she thought of the barns, horses, cows, sheep - everything. A big big fire blazing on the hearth with great inviting wooden arm chairs - how good it did look and feel to those fellows after their tramp in the snow. They waited no invitation to be seated and the wooden bowl full of foamy dough and the smell of the frying cakes - grandmother gave her kitchen of (?) to a girl who and sent her into the kitchen proper where some servants had come in to toast by the fire and said, "Sit down boys, and we will have some cider for you." The boys felt sure of their game and the smell of the cakes, and the prospect of cheer beguiled them and good little grandmother knew how to make the best of a bad situation. It was not the first time that these gangs had been about. The cider was hot - set by the fire to heat - good strong cider, with a drop in it. Always there was a plan laid, if an attack threatened.

         Oh, the grand-mothers of the war time. She joked with the boys saying you've caught us this time, you are more lucky than those fellow who came around last, but be easy with us. I'll treat you well, so don't destroy what you don't take, you know the Quakers are peaceable and make friends with everybody, even those who called enemies - but in the providence of things all are one in the sight of the Father. The cider began to work, the hot good cakes did their share and being so softlyen sconced and knowing the man of the house was away, they ate and frank and snoozed a little and the time went on. Finally they went to the barns - to find that all the live stock had been driven to West Chester, and a small army of neighbors had come with guns to help their neighbor - they had been fairly beaten and no blood shed - then our little grandmother laid her hands on her hips and laughed for she was a merry woman, and old Sam, the master par excellence among the servants, said, "We did better then the masta could." And for his ready wit was filled with cider and dough-nuts.

         Another Story of Myannah. As I have said Grandfather was often from home, feeling so safe with leaving his better half at home to protect the house. It was as stone house with walls two feet if not more thick, heavy windows, shutters well ironed - "Sam, Misses was coming" - "All right Sam, call the boys, get the girls, find all the guns, shovels, big boats they'll think it is an army. Make all the noise you can, bolt the doors, call down stairs up stairs, tramp like horses, point the guns and fire, load fast, get at different windows. Some get to the top chambers - don't be afraid - fire away - and raise away. Thus the little grandmother again - the Skinners, for it was just a party of them, thought the house was garrisoned and again the little woman put her hands on her hips and laughed and the castle was saved.

    Another bit, being Quakers, they were non-combatants - but some had declared "the old fellow must have money hidden. They would catch him. Perhaps it was intuition. Never mind, it was her business to take care of her husband, and seeing danger she meant to get him safe - there had been a talk among the neighbors that "they were after Massa" This had been floating in the air. "Take your master Sam - open a hole in the stone wall of the orchard, build it up around him - take your gun - a good ways off from him - and do as tho you were saving the orchard, keep away from him - and if you have to fire among them the boys will be armed and ready to jump for them. All night grandfather laid in his stone chamber, all night Sam took care of the orchard. Nothing was hurt. They went off, swearing they would come another day for the d---d Quaker and grandmother had a nice boiled chicken for the beloved man she meant to take care of - many stories of this brave woman, full of fun and vim - from my mothers many stories. The word fear had no meaning to "Wyannah" - the hall was broad but was much broadened at the far end, here in the old time was the dining room - all the meals were eaten there in the summer. I rather think the middle kitchen was used in winter. My grandfather was a mild autocrat - and was called "Master", but his wonderfully bright alost wife was the soul of the manor, wise enough to make him believe he was the ruler. She loved her John with a true heart - always she the first up is the morning to be about tending to the spinning girl, seeing that the host in the kitchen were up and around. (?) Grandfather left to finish his morning nap. Always in the cellar hung a tender chicken or two ready for the coals and dearly she liked to pet her husband suggesting his poor appetite, if he waited a little before he ate, "Go Kate, throw a chicken on the coals, your master would like to have it." I fancy the said chick was very near done when Katy went for it, for mother said it came on the table in an incredibly short space of time, then grandmother would say, "John, try to eat it." Probably, grandfather John had been filled with a good lunch at bed time, with perhaps a pleasant night cap of Punch so common in those days of coaring. At one time, they had a well there with buckets - a child in playing fall in - grandmother saw it and in a moment caught the rope of the bucket and swung herself down and brot up her drenched child. Mother said she never waited to parley - fearless - quick to comprehend - first in the home. She died long before I was born. Oh dear, I had no grandparents living as I have said and oh how I have yearned for them, saved every item I can get - few indeed - if I had lived in the East I could have gotten more - With what reverence I used to look at the ancient furniture in the room where she and grandfather slept. I seemed to have realized the latter from knowing my uncle Elijah Ferris being there so much during my childhood he somehow fell heir to the homestead and there it was and is, not very different in its outward look from the aims the Skinners and Bautboys made their raids. Uncle Elijah was a splendid looking man much too as mother used to describe her father. "The master", he too was called, and was the same as I have said by nature a mild sort of autocrat and his wife, the second she, I knew, petted him much in the way that as he said his mother had petted his father. Uncle Elijah like his father was sort of noble of the manor always a plate was set for the stranger that might come at meal time, always a beautiful table. At one end the famous hams, which was a part of the institution of the house. Every Saturday morning, old Billy had the famous iron pet swung upon the crane filled with cold water and in it, the ham. Never a ham was eaten until it was a year old - ripe - cured with such a receipe as a king would like to have - so much sugar, so much salt petre - well all day the kettle swung on the orange with a gentle simmer just up to the edge of boiling. To Dilly, if the master who at interval came to see how it progressed found it boiling, "Dilly", he would say in strong emphasis, "do you know that this ham is perhaps ruined?" If uncle said 'you' with emphasis so contrary to his Quaker language, the castle 'thee', even to the dog and horses they said 'thee', Dilly never much alarmed at her master's 'you' said, "I'll see to that Master Ferris." He was no master for Dilly for she held the rod of empire thro the length and breadth of that farm and she knew it well - Yet generally the old gentleman tried to be as I have said the mild supreme - and dilly upheld him in this except as regarding her own position. Every cow knew when the soothing bitter sweet ointment was softly rubbed on the bruised parts of it's hurt leg that all would be well. The poor boy Dick who had chill blains got well when Dilly planted him in the corner of the kitchen chimney and put a pail of salt hay under his frost bites - and set the hay while his feet seemed boiling over the hot stuff. Take his feet off? Not a stir until Aunt Dilly said they could, if ever the Son worked anywhere it did under that potent withered bent old woman, her shoulders I can only describe in this way, if a large pumpkin were out in two and the half put over her shoulders and her dress drawn over it, it would look like Dilly's shoulders, the seams of her face looked as tho they were smoked, deep seams. She was a white woman, altho the smoke from the fire place and from her pipe had left indelible marks, so bent was she one had to look down and under to see really well, her face - remember Augustus that now I am talking of the time when my uncle Elijah was the master and when I was a little girl that this Aunt Dilly held away - I wish you could have been a little boy then, too, but then you know, it was not possible - but oh how you would have enjoyed seeing Uncle Elijah toast the sausage", you see then the sausage meat was shopped in a famous big trough and for a week in the winter evenings all the available force of servants and axes, cleavers, short hatchets had been plied to get the meat fine enough to be packed in jars, some of it also in skins - finally Dilly said, "its fine enough you'd ort to have had it down long ago." Well, then for the seasoning. To so much meat so much salt, black pepper, a "leetle" osyene - let it lay over night with the seasoning to get thro it - next night always there was a sort of charm about night work, the hogs must e cut at night, doughnuts cooked, nuts cracked to put away in large earthen jars - "to (?) ready." Always this the watchword, to "be ready" beautiful in its meaning of hospitality. In the living room a blazing fire the blaze lighting the whole room altho Uncle Elijah had the round stand with the two brass candlesticks and in the tray all as bright - as rubbing and rotten stone could make them, so were the and irons - with their steeple tops - in the days of your ancestors anything that could be make bright - by hands were - red lead for painting the bricks of the fire place, potlead for brightening any iron lid - whiting for silver, and wax for furniture. If only your mother could have lived in those days when even the pots and kettles used in the kitchen were made as bright as a knife blade for two inches below the rim."
  3. [S20] Eliza Seaman Leggett, Journal of Eliza Seaman Leggett, "... the good Grandmother Myannah, how she was always the first one up in the horse and did not disturb Grandfather until the breakfast was ready - generally he was down by this time - but on his not coming his grandson Lyndley M. Ferris, a little boy, was sent up to call him - and found him seated on the side of the bed partly dressed. He turned to Lyndley and said, "I'm dying, and before the family could be called, he was gone..."
  4. [S20] Eliza Seaman Leggett, Journal of Eliza Seaman Leggett, The Ferris family "burying ground" this is the way they were designated, has received far before the Revolutionary War the departed of the Ferris family. My grandparents lie there, John and Mary Ferris, my own mother, brother Percival Seaman, but my brother Doctor William F. Seaman and my sister Marianna Middlebrok were buried in North Street - the bodies or as much as could be fathered of them were taken a few years ago to Greenwood, the society of friends burying ground attached to Greenwood Cemetery but as no one knows of a single dear one - oh! My beautiful beloved sister Marianna, my revered father, and my dearly almost worshipped brother William - think not of their graves and try to take them to my soul as being still conscious of my never-dying love..."

Marianna "Myanna" Hunt

F, b. circa 1738, d. 9 July 1809
      (an unknown value). Marianna was born circa 1738 at Westchester, Westchester County, New York. She was the daughter of Thomas Hunt and Mary Anna Patrick. Marianna married John Ferris on 15 December 1756 at Westchester County, New York. Marianna died Sunday, 9 July 1809 at "Grove Farm", Throgs Neck, Westchester County, New York. She died of colic that was supposed to come from eating cherries and drinking milk. She was sick only a short time. She was buried in the Ferris Family Burying Ground.1

Family

John Ferris b. 9 Jun 1733, d. 3 Jan 1814
Children

Citations

  1. [S20] Eliza Seaman Leggett, Journal of Eliza Seaman Leggett, "Myanna Hunt Ferris died later of colic supposed to come from eating cherries and drinking milk - was sick but a short time; so the brave little grandmother passed from the home in which she had been the great power."

John Ferris II

M, b. circa 1757
John Ferris II|b. c 1757|p3.htm#i31128|John Ferris|b. 9 Jun 1733\nd. 3 Jan 1814|p3.htm#i31126|Marianna "Myanna" Hunt|b. c 1738\nd. 9 Jul 1809|p3.htm#i31127|||||||||||||
FatherJohn Ferris b. 9 Jun 1733, d. 3 Jan 1814
MotherMarianna "Myanna" Hunt b. c 1738, d. 9 Jul 1809
     John was born circa 1757 at "Grove Farm", Throgs Neck, Westchester County, New York. He died an unknown date while yet a young man at at sea.

William Ferris

M, b. circa 1759
William Ferris|b. c 1759|p3.htm#i31129|John Ferris|b. 9 Jun 1733\nd. 3 Jan 1814|p3.htm#i31126|Marianna "Myanna" Hunt|b. c 1738\nd. 9 Jul 1809|p3.htm#i31127|||||||||||||
FatherJohn Ferris b. 9 Jun 1733, d. 3 Jan 1814
MotherMarianna "Myanna" Hunt b. c 1738, d. 9 Jul 1809
     William was born circa 1759 at "Grove Farm", Throgs Neck, Westchester County, New York. He died when he was young at "Grove Farm", Throgs Neck, Westchester County, New York.

Marianna Ferris

F, b. circa 1761, d. before 25 April 1795 [second
Marianna Ferris|b. c 1761\nd. before 25 April 1795 [second|p3.htm#i31130|John Ferris|b. 9 Jun 1733\nd. 3 Jan 1814|p3.htm#i31126|Marianna "Myanna" Hunt|b. c 1738\nd. 9 Jul 1809|p3.htm#i31127|||||||||||||
FatherJohn Ferris b. 9 Jun 1733, d. 3 Jan 1814
MotherMarianna "Myanna" Hunt b. c 1738, d. 9 Jul 1809
     Marianna was born circa 1761 at "Grove Farm", Throgs Neck, Westchester County, New York. Marianna married Benjamin Pell on 25 November 1778 at Westchester County, New York. Marianna died before 25 April 1795 second at New York. Before the 25th day of the second month 1795.

Family

Benjamin Pell b. 1740, d. 2 Mar 1828
Children

Benjamin Pell1

M, b. 1740, d. 2 March 1828
     Benjamin was born in 1740 at Pellham Manor, Westchester County, New York. Benjamin married Marianna Ferris, daughter of John Ferris and Marianna "Myanna" Hunt, on 25 November 1778 at Westchester County, New York. (an unknown value). Benjamin died Sunday, 2 March 1828 at age 88 years.

Family

Marianna Ferris b. c 1761, d. before 25 April 1795 [second
Children

Citations

  1. [S5] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Volume III: page 252 - New York Monthly Meeting - children of Benjamin & Mary Pell: Sands b. 3-1-1786; Gilbert b. 2-15-1788; Ferris b. 8-15-1790; Benjamin m. 2nd 2-25-1795 at Westbury Mary Titus.

Elvin Ferris

M, b. circa 1763
Elvin Ferris|b. c 1763|p3.htm#i31132|John Ferris|b. 9 Jun 1733\nd. 3 Jan 1814|p3.htm#i31126|Marianna "Myanna" Hunt|b. c 1738\nd. 9 Jul 1809|p3.htm#i31127|||||||||||||
FatherJohn Ferris b. 9 Jun 1733, d. 3 Jan 1814
MotherMarianna "Myanna" Hunt b. c 1738, d. 9 Jul 1809
     Elvin was born circa 1763 at "Grove Farm", Throgs Neck, Westchester County, New York. Elvin married Anna Muckleworth circa 1787 at New York.

Family

Anna Muckleworth
Children

Anna Muckleworth

F
     Anna was born. Anna married Elvin Ferris, son of John Ferris and Marianna "Myanna" Hunt, circa 1787 at New York.

Family

Elvin Ferris b. c 1763
Children

Jonathan Ferris

M, b. circa 1765, d. 1 October 1829
Jonathan Ferris|b. c 1765\nd. 1 Oct 1829|p3.htm#i31134|John Ferris|b. 9 Jun 1733\nd. 3 Jan 1814|p3.htm#i31126|Marianna "Myanna" Hunt|b. c 1738\nd. 9 Jul 1809|p3.htm#i31127|||||||||||||
FatherJohn Ferris b. 9 Jun 1733, d. 3 Jan 1814
MotherMarianna "Myanna" Hunt b. c 1738, d. 9 Jul 1809
     Jonathan was born circa 1765 at "Grove Farm", Throgs Neck, Westchester County, New York. Jonathan married Ursula Catlin on 4 June 1803. (an unknown value). Jonathan died Thursday, 1 October 1829 at Lawnton, Vermont, V. He had been suffering from paralysis.1

Family

Ursula Catlin b. 1780, d. 1858
Children

Citations

  1. [S20] Eliza Seaman Leggett, Journal of Eliza Seaman Leggett, According to a rememberance of his neice, Eliza Seaman - "Uncle Johnathan Ferris had paralysis, died at Lownton, Vermont. Excellent, I used to see him in my childhood twice a year in New York. He left a very large estate, marble quarries."

Ursula Catlin

F, b. 1780, d. 1858
     Ursula was born in 1780. Ursula married Jonathan Ferris, son of John Ferris and Marianna "Myanna" Hunt, on 4 June 1803. Ursula died 1858 at age 78 years.

Family

Jonathan Ferris b. c 1765, d. 1 Oct 1829
Children

Elijah Ferris1,2

M, b. 24 January 1768, d. 7 May 1842
Elijah Ferris|b. 24 Jan 1768\nd. 7 May 1842|p3.htm#i31136|John Ferris|b. 9 Jun 1733\nd. 3 Jan 1814|p3.htm#i31126|Marianna "Myanna" Hunt|b. c 1738\nd. 9 Jul 1809|p3.htm#i31127|||||||||||||
FatherJohn Ferris b. 9 Jun 1733, d. 3 Jan 1814
MotherMarianna "Myanna" Hunt b. c 1738, d. 9 Jul 1809
     Elijah was born on Sunday, 24 January 1768 at "Grove Farm", Throgs Neck, Westchester County, New York. Another source said he was born 26 January 1768. Elijah married Phebe Haviland on 2 April 1791 at New York. The 2nd day of the second month of 1791. (an unknown value). Elijah married Amelia Livingston circa 1804 at New York. Elijah died Saturday, 7 May 1842 at "Grove Farm", Throgs Neck, Westchester County, New York, at age 74 years, 3 months and 13 days.

Family 1

Phebe Haviland b. 27 Nov 1770, d. 19 May 1801
Children

Family 2

Amelia Livingston b. 5 Oct 1772, d. 1 Mar 1853
Children

Citations

  1. [S5] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Volume III: page 117 - New York Monthly Meeting - Elijah Ferris m. 1 day 2nd month 1791 Phebe Haviland, d/o Ebenezer & Jane, She d. 5/19/1801, age 30 years; Anna [2/26/1793]. Phebe Jane [9/06/1797], John Haviland [11/17/1799] & Elijah [6/10/1790].
  2. [S10] Elizabeth Seaman Leggett, Journals of Elizabeth Seaman Leggett, "Uncle Elijah was a splendid looking man much too as mother used to describe her father. "The master", he too was called, and was the same as I have said by nature a mild sort of autocrat and his wife, the second she, I knew, petted him much in the way that as he said his mother had petted his father. Uncle Elijah like his father was sort of noble of the manor always a plate was set for the stranger that might come at meal time, always a beautiful table. At one end the famous hams, which was a part of the institution of the house.
         So uncle and his big brass spectacles with round glasses sat in the most comfortable chair in the room. Aunt Amelia on the other side of the fire place knitting, big cat on the rug and the younger ones disposed in many ways on the great sofa or floor. All know it was the evening for the "tasting" - smelt the sausage cooking - then old Dilly with her flounced cap, the flounce yellow from smoke hanging in great fullness half over her eyes.
         "Mr. Ferris, get ready," she said, "then (?) sausage must be et not - no stoppin to finish enny reedin."
         So "git-reddy" was the word. "then," said Dilly, with a peculiar emphasis as much as to say, "I suppose you'll find fault" - of course Mr. Ferris always did - then the spectacles were pushed to the top of the head - and the bit of dry bread and hot sausage. I don't believe you ever saw an old man try to taste the fine flavor of anything, such a sort of looking up to the ceiling for fear he might not just get the too full of too little of the seasoning. "Well," impatiently comes from Dilly. "Dilly, it isn't right, I don't know just what it wants, it doesn't some up to my mothers seasoning." Dilly breaks in "your mother, sposo not" - well Mr. Ferris what do they want?" Always this with a growl. "I guess Dilly it had better lay over til tomorrow perhaps a trifle of salt." "Yes, yes, I knowed it, and all that mess of most to be worked over again, I think its right just as it is." "try it again Dilly, bring in some hot ones." So we waited while Dilly skipped about, mad, coming in pretty soon - with the nice brown things. Dilly always "carved" these days but Uncle felt it was sort of better to find his little fault. Just this today as I have said that this beloved uncle Elija always has held the placed in my heart as grandfather - as grandfather, living as he did at the old homestead - with all the old fashioned bits of furniture, hospitable, very, and as I have called him the mild autocrat - the door yard was large and persons could be seen coming some minutes before they reached the house, although it was said, "Friends are coming." No one stirred from their seat except uncle - it was a rule with hi to welcome friends himself if at home - he would rise quickly from his seat, put down his paper, push his spectacles on the top of his head and get to the front door by the time the company got there - and then the welcome. "I'm heartily glad to see you?" taking both hands of the first comer and so on. Now just look at the old gentleman, it is summer, and a good breeze comes from the Sounds, the back door is open, the gracious garden high with flowers, sending sweetness thro and thro. The smile on the dear face, followed bya genial laugh - the white hair in hundreds of little rings of curls fall below the blad - has blown by the fresh breeze - and all the time showers of tiny petals from the multiflora Rose skimming thro the hall as tho they too wanted to add to the genial greeting then the family found time to take the hands and make, more and more the welcome. This was always the way, as I have said on the table always a plate for the stranger, always some delicate good thing in reserve to be brot on the table. Aunt Amelia was a good housekeeper - she made doughnuts and ginger nuts for "every day cake" by the firkin full, while the rich plum cake was deposited in a great earthen jar lined in brown sugar to keep it moist. It would keep good and fresh for always; but generally it was expected to last a year only to be taken when company came - choice bit - I was once at a friend's house and I said, "Cousin Mary, how is it that always thee has plum cake?" "Well," she replied, "thee sees dear - the doctor likes a hearty meal - and is somewhat of an epicure so our friends have satisfied their hunger before it is time to pop the cake, then I always make good gingerbread which is passes first, if the cake after that - jumbles and when it is time to pass the plum cake our friends generally say, "well really, you have so much that is nice - but I will take a small bit of that rich cake, Mary, thee does always tempt us so." And very little is eaten of it. So with Aunt Amelia all excellent things in readiness - in the cool cellar a jar of cream in winter ready made with a little bit of lemon in it - an egg or more broken then sweetened and a good flavor of brandy - the small whip churn - beside it and a great bowl of the delicious foamy luxury was ready in "a few minutes to add to a plain desert. Like my old grandmother Anna - chicken ready to be tossed on the hot coals - and the weekly ham - so that a sort or "company dinner" ever at a minutes warning - I have told thee that always then ham must be a year old before it was eaten and the process of simmering the whole day, then set away to get cold. Uncle was famous for his receipt for curing hams - proud he was but never expected to have anyone ask a second time for it at a meal, always it was the bit to flavor the other most on the table, exactly two inches as a rule was the allowance - it had to last the week out. At the marriage of any one of his neices - one of these hams was the wedding gift with strong direction regarding the cooking, "Now mind thee never lets it boil."" When thy grandmother Eliza, (thats me) he sent me one of his finest also altho it was the 23rd of November - great water melons - really they were an ornament to the table, the black waiters plumed themselves on cutting them fancifully..."
    "My Uncle Elijah Ferris had a sort of lingering weakness, no especial disease. He too died at Grove Farm, the good, genial, hospitable, beautiful old man.

Phebe Haviland

F, b. 27 November 1770, d. 19 May 1801
     Phebe was born on Tuesday, 27 November 1770. She was the daughter of Ebenezer & Jane Haviland. (an unknown value). Phebe married Elijah Ferris, son of John Ferris and Marianna "Myanna" Hunt, on 2 April 1791 at New York. The 2nd day of the second month of 1791. Phebe died Tuesday, 19 May 1801 at "Grove Farm", Throgs Neck, Westchester County, New York, at age 30 years, 5 months and 22 days.

Family

Elijah Ferris b. 24 Jan 1768, d. 7 May 1842
Children

Amelia Livingston

F, b. 5 October 1772, d. 1 March 1853
     Amelia was born on Monday, 5 October 1772 at New York. Amelia married Elijah Ferris, son of John Ferris and Marianna "Myanna" Hunt, circa 1804 at New York. Amelia died Tuesday, 1 March 1853 at the family home "Grove Farm", Throgs Neck, Westchester County, New York, at age 80 years, 4 months and 24 days.

Family

Elijah Ferris b. 24 Jan 1768, d. 7 May 1842
Children

Elizabeth "Betsey" Ferris

F, b. circa 1774, d. 22 November 1830
Elizabeth "Betsey" Ferris|b. c 1774\nd. 22 Nov 1830|p3.htm#i31139|John Ferris|b. 9 Jun 1733\nd. 3 Jan 1814|p3.htm#i31126|Marianna "Myanna" Hunt|b. c 1738\nd. 9 Jul 1809|p3.htm#i31127|||||||||||||
FatherJohn Ferris b. 9 Jun 1733, d. 3 Jan 1814
MotherMarianna "Myanna" Hunt b. c 1738, d. 9 Jul 1809
     Elizabeth was born circa 1774 at "Grove Farm", Throgs Neck, Westchester County, New York. Elizabeth married Dr. Thomas T. Cock on 19 January 1809 at New York. (an unknown value). Elizabeth died Monday, 22 November 1830 at her home on Beekman Street, City, County & State of New York.1 Elizabeth was buried at the Friend's Burying Ground on North Street, City, County & State of New York.2

Family

Dr. Thomas T. Cock b. 12 Jan 1783, d. 22 Jan 1831
Children

Citations

  1. [S20] Eliza Seaman Leggett, Journal of Eliza Seaman Leggett, According to her niece, Eliza Seaman - "     Aunt Betsy Cock was about 60 years I think never sick until her last sickness, a sort of failing away - beautiful, popular, witty, very fond of society, thought her husband Doctor Cock the one man in the world. She died in Beekman Street, New York."
  2. [S47] Autobiograph of Eliza Seaman Leggett - 8 October 1889, Eliza speaks of Betsey's burial.

Dr. Thomas T. Cock1

M, b. 12 January 1783, d. 22 January 1831
     Thomas was born on Sunday, 12 January 1783 at Matinecock, Queens County, Long Island, New York. He was the son of Daniel & Rosanna Cock. Thomas married Elizabeth "Betsey" Ferris, daughter of John Ferris and Marianna "Myanna" Hunt, on 19 January 1809 at New York. (an unknown value). Thomas died Saturday, 22 January 1831 at City, County & State of New York, at age 48 years and 10 days. 22nd day of the eleventh nomth of 1831. He (an unknown value).

Family

Elizabeth "Betsey" Ferris b. c 1774, d. 22 Nov 1830
Children

Citations

  1. [S5] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Volume III: page 75 - New York Monthly Meething - Thomas T. Cock, s/o Daniel & Rosanna, m. Elizabeth T. ___; d. 11-22-1830 age 55 years - Children: Eliza H., Ann Augusta, Emily, Thomas T.

Augusta "Gussie" Leggett1,2

F, b. 14 November 1851, d. 30 December 1903
Augusta "Gussie" Leggett|b. 14 Nov 1851\nd. 30 Dec 1903|p3.htm#i33257|Augustus "Gussie" Wright Leggett|b. 11 Jun 1816\nd. 12 January 1885 [Monday]|p1.htm#i30107|Elizabeth "Eliza" Seaman|b. 9 May 1815\nd. 9 Feb 1900|p1.htm#i30108|||||||Dr. Valentine Seaman|b. 2 Mar 1770\nd. 3 Jul 1817|p2.htm#i30920|Anna Ferris|b. 8 Dec 1771\nd. 5 Nov 1854|p2.htm#i30921|
FatherAugustus "Gussie" Wright Leggett b. 11 Jun 1816, d. 12 January 1885 [Monday]
MotherElizabeth "Eliza" Seaman b. 9 May 1815, d. 9 Feb 1900
Augusta [Leggett] Pease
     Augusta was born on Friday, 14 November 1851 at Roslyn, Queens County, Long Island, New York. Augusta married Elisha Brook Pease on 5 September 1871 at 169 Elizabeth Street, Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan. They were married at the home of her parents. Augusta died Wednesday, 30 December 1903 at Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, at age 52 years, 1 month and 16 days. She died in the Iroquios Theater fire with her daughter-in-law and her grandaughter. 602 people died in this tradgic event. Augusta was buried at Woodmere Cemetery, Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan.

Family

Elisha Brook Pease b. 24 Dec 1848, d. 16 Aug 1895
Child

Citations

  1. [S7] Iroquois Theater Fire, The Detroit Free Press, 31 December 1903: front page headline - [BO:Hundreds Perish in Chicago Fire - Iroquois Theater Destroyed and Appalling Loss of Life;:BO] 1 January 1904: front page headline - [BO:City Regulations Not Lived Up To:BO]. page 2 - many Michigan people among the dead, Mrs. E. Brooks Pease of Detroit pictured & listed among the dead along with her daughter-law & granddaughter Elizabeth Pease of Chicago - "Early yesterday morning, James Whittemore, patent attorney, of this city, received a telegram from Percival Pease, of Chicago, formerly of Detroit, saying that Mrs. E. Brooke Pease, his mother, Mrs. Grace Camp Pease, his wife, and his eight year old daughter, Elizabeth, had been killed in the disaster. Mrs. E. Brooke was a well known resident of this city and was in Chicago on a visit to her son. Percival Pease was born and brought up in Detroit, but of late had been connected with a type foundary in Chicago. Mrs. Pease lived at 96 East Montcalm Street. Her body had not been found last night, according to the Associated Press, but that of the child had been recovered. Mrs. Pease was a sister of Mrs. L. T. Ives, mother of Dr. A. W. & Percy Ives, and of Mrs. C. C. Randall and Mrs. James Whittemore, of Detroit, Mrs. Adolph Barthel, of Detroit, William H. Leggett, of Detroit, and Mortimer A. Leggett, of Pontiac, Michigan."; 2 January 1904: front page small headline - Body of Mrs. E. Brooke Pease Has Not Been Found - "James Whittemore, 67 Garfield Avenue, last night received a telegram from Percival Pease in Chicago, telling him that up to that time, the body of his mother had not been found. Valentine S. Ives, 46 Palmer Avenue East, has gone to Chicago to assist in the search."; 3 January 1904: "long search for body of Mrs. E. B. Pease. of Detroit, ended early yesterday, when Percival S. Pease identified the body at Jordan's. Pease had been searching since Wednesday night, and had almost given up hope, but early yesterday he found in the city custodian's office a return trip ticket to Detroit on the Wabash Railroad and a ring with the letter "P" inside. It was unrecognizable but the shoes bore a Detroit store mark and the clothing was a Detroit make. Dr. A. W. Ives said last night that the bodies of Mrs. E. B. Pease, Mrs. Percival S. Pease, Mrs, Pease's daughter, Elizabeth will arrive in Detroit at 7:15 this morning over the Michigan Central. With them will be Percival S. Pease, Valentine F. Ives, Mrs. Adolph Bartell, all relatives of the deceased..."; 4 January 1904: Body of the Pease Victims Are Here - "three bodies to be buried in Woodmere Cemetery..."
  2. [S6] Iroquois Theater Fire, Chicago Daily Tribune, 1903, December 30: Iroquois Theater Fire
    Chicago's most deadly fire occurred less than a month after the opening of the new, supposedly fireproof Iroquois Theater at 24-28 W. Randolph. It was standing room only for a holiday matinee of the popular musical "Mr. Blue Beard, Jr." Of the 1,900 people in the audience, mostly women and children, at least 600 perished. Among the 500 performers and backstage personnel, only the tightrope artist caught high above the stage died.
    Due to a long history of theater fires in the U.S. and Europe, by 1903 fire precautions were well developed, but not followed by the Iroquois Theater management. The primary danger came from the stage scenery consisting of many canvas backdrops painted with highly flammable oil paints and suspended in midair close to a large number of hot lights. In a number of fatal fires, including the Iroquois the scenery caught fire, then quickly reached almost explosive proportions.
    Standard precautions which had functioned well in other localities included firemen stationed near the stage with fire extinguishers, hoses and pikes for pulling down scenery. In case of fire, an asbestos or iron curtain would drop down cutting the audience off from the stage and its burning scenery. Adequate exits and trained ushers would prevent deaths from panic.
    Neglect of all of these factors contributed to the huge death toll in the Iroquois Theater fire. At 3:15 p.m. a hot light started flames crackling up a velvet curtain. The on-duty fireman was equipped only with two tubes of patent powder called Kilfyres. Sprinkling these on the fire proved totally ineffective. The theater lacked fire hoses, extinguishers or any other means of fighting fires above the fireman's head.
    The asbestos fire curtain got stuck before it reached the full down position due either to projecting lamps or cheap wooden tracks. This left a gap which exposed the audience to flame and smoke. The curtain was apparently instantly consumed in the fire anyway. Testimony revealed that the curtain was probably not made of a fire proof material. Curtain reinforcements as well as the tracks in which it rode were cheaply constructed of wood leading to probable failure in a fire. The inexperienced stage crew was slow to pull down the curtain, not able to unjam it, and as at least one witness testified, may have pulled down a scenery curtain, instead of the ineffectual fire curtain.
    As the fire started the orchestra played on, and the leading actor urged people to remain seated. Although this no doubt prevented some deaths from panic, those who heeded his advice perished in the explosive smoke and flames. A number of bodies were found still seated. The theater management had added iron gates over many of the exit doors. Some of the gates were locked, others were unlocked but opening them required operation of a small lever of a type unfamiliar to most theater patrons. Other doors opened inwards. The theater had had no fire drills so ushers and theater personnel neither opened the doors, nor directed people to safe exits. Many people were trapped behind unopened doors. The time it took to open other doors added to the fatal panic as it forced almost everyone to use the main exits.
    Even though it was outside the fire area, trampled bodies were piled ten high in the stairwell area where exits from the balcony met the exit from the main floor. More fatalities occurred when fire broke out underneath an alley fire escape. People above the fire jumped. The first to jump died as they hit the hard pavement. Later jumpers landed on the bodies and survived. The same scenario happened as patrons jumped from the balcony to the main floor of the theater. All injuries occurred within 15 minutes of the start of the fire, which was put out by the fire department within half an hour.
    The largely undamaged building reopened less than a year later and operated as the Colonial Theater until it was torn down in 1925.

Percival "Percy" Leggett

M, b. 11 July 1874, d. 29 July 1874
Percival "Percy" Leggett|b. 11 Jul 1874\nd. 29 Jul 1874|p3.htm#i33258|Mortimer "Mort" Allen Leggett|b. 18 Oct 1837\nd. 18 Nov 1930|p1.htm#i30128|Jane "Jennie" Mais Whitehead|b. 8 Aug 1839\nd. 11 Jul 1874|p1.htm#i30129|Augustus "Gussie" Wright Leggett|b. 11 Jun 1816\nd. 12 January 1885 [Monday]|p1.htm#i30107|Elizabeth "Eliza" Seaman|b. 9 May 1815\nd. 9 Feb 1900|p1.htm#i30108|||||||
FatherMortimer "Mort" Allen Leggett b. 18 Oct 1837, d. 18 Nov 1930
MotherJane "Jennie" Mais Whitehead b. 8 Aug 1839, d. 11 Jul 1874
     Percival was born on Saturday, 11 July 1874 at Waterford Township, Oakland County, Michigan. Percival died Wednesday, 29 July 1874 at Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan, at age 18 days. Death record: male Leggett died age 18 days in Detroit, son of Mortimer A. & Jennie M. Leggett of debility infancy. [Oakland County death records: Volume I, page 97], He is buried in Oakhill Cemetery. [plot 1-169]

Elisha Brook Pease

M, b. 24 December 1848, d. 16 August 1895
     Elisha was born on Sunday, 24 December 1848. Elisha married Augusta "Gussie" Leggett, daughter of Augustus "Gussie" Wright Leggett and Elizabeth "Eliza" Seaman, on 5 September 1871 at 169 Elizabeth Street, Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan. They were married at the home of her parents. Elisha died Friday, 16 August 1895 at Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan, at age 46 years, 7 months and 23 days.

Family

Augusta "Gussie" Leggett b. 14 Nov 1851, d. 30 Dec 1903
Child

Percival Seaman "Percy" Pease

M, b. circa 1872
Percival Seaman "Percy" Pease|b. c 1872|p3.htm#i33260|Elisha Brook Pease|b. 24 Dec 1848\nd. 16 Aug 1895|p3.htm#i33259|Augusta "Gussie" Leggett|b. 14 Nov 1851\nd. 30 Dec 1903|p3.htm#i33257|||||||Augustus "Gussie" Wright Leggett|b. 11 Jun 1816\nd. 12 January 1885 [Monday]|p1.htm#i30107|Elizabeth "Eliza" Seaman|b. 9 May 1815\nd. 9 Feb 1900|p1.htm#i30108|
FatherElisha Brook Pease b. 24 Dec 1848, d. 16 Aug 1895
MotherAugusta "Gussie" Leggett b. 14 Nov 1851, d. 30 Dec 1903
     Percival was born circa 1872 at 169 Elizabeth Street, Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan. This was the home of his grandparents, Augustus & Eliza Leggett. Percival married Grace Camp.

Family

Grace Camp d. 30 Dec 1903
Child

Alice Kendall Stewart

F, b. 1876
     Alice was born in 1876. She was the daughter of Frederick Spencer Stewart [1836-1900] m. 1872 Clara Pierce[1840-1915]. Alice married Chandler Corrydon Randall, son of Corrydon Chandler Randall and Anna Seaman Leggett, in 1900.

Family

Chandler Corrydon Randall b. 1881

Elizabeth Pease

F, d. 30 December 1903
Elizabeth Pease|d. 30 Dec 1903|p3.htm#i33296|Percival Seaman "Percy" Pease|b. c 1872|p3.htm#i33260|Grace Camp|d. 30 Dec 1903|p3.htm#i33297|Elisha B. Pease|b. 24 Dec 1848\nd. 16 Aug 1895|p3.htm#i33259|Augusta "Gussie" Leggett|b. 14 Nov 1851\nd. 30 Dec 1903|p3.htm#i33257|||||||
FatherPercival Seaman "Percy" Pease b. c 1872
MotherGrace Camp d. 30 Dec 1903
     Elizabeth was born at Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan. Elizabeth died Wednesday, 30 December 1903 at Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. She died in the Iroquios Theater fire with her mother and grandmother. Elizabeth was buried at Woodmere Cemetery, Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan.

Grace Camp

F, d. 30 December 1903
     Grace was born. Grace married Percival Seaman "Percy" Pease, son of Elisha Brook Pease and Augusta "Gussie" Leggett. Grace died Wednesday, 30 December 1903 at Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. She died in the Iroquios Theater fire with her daughter and her mother-in-law. Her body was interred at (an unknown value) at Woodmere Cemetery, Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan.

Family

Percival Seaman "Percy" Pease b. c 1872
Child

Julia Claire Chandler

F, b. 25 August 1873
     Julia was born on Monday, 25 August 1873 at New York. She was the daughter of Harvey Chandler. Julia married Dr. Augustus Wright Ives, son of Lewis Thomas Ives and Margaret "Minnie" Wright Leggett, on 31 July 1901 at Massachusetts. Julia died at Alexandria, Virginia.

Family

Dr. Augustus Wright Ives b. 21 Jun 1861
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